Construction Plans

  1. Create Points on the DXF linework.
  2. Setup base on arbitrary coordinate.
  3. Measure at least 4 “control” points. (You will choose whether you want to use each point for horizontal and/or vertical use. If you measure 4 and one of them is outside your tolerance the deselect the aspect that is out. We use an 0.08’ tolerance so that we never get outside of a tenth.)
  4. Create new points and begin layout.
3 Likes

Thankyou @timd1971 @chascoadmin for your help and expanding my knowledge of surveying.

3 Likes

You’d use your CORS instead of another Base.

I think generally you only want 1 vertical, as more may complicate your verticals? The more control points the better obviously. It will depend on your needs if you need to measure more than 1 vertical.

Verticals aren’t usually necessary for my use case so I am sure that would be fine.

1 Like

Yeah! :grinning:

1 Like

I agree. There is also Carlson SurvCE/PC, but I like FieldGenius so much more. It’s prettier too! :upside_down_face:

Lots of support at MicroSurvey and those guys over there are just great.

Not sure what other third party solutions offer localization that are top notch?

Edit: Survey Pro

4 Likes

I see that MicroSurvey has released some android field genius videos on their youtube channel in the last several days. They must be close to releasing.

2 Likes

close probably…but Sept end of beta.


Not sure Localization is ready or implemented??? We’ll have to wait and see.

4 Likes

You actually want at least 3 boxing in the site as best is possible. Remember that pretty much everything we do is based on trigonometry. One point is plane that can rotate on x and y, two points rotates on y and three points somewhat nails it down, but can leave the localization weak on one end unless the site is triangular. Boxing a site in with four points is the best method. Because it is distributing the error across the entire site preferably those four points all have good xyz values. Two verticals would be okay as long as they are on opposite extents of the site.

3 Likes

Good points. No pun intended. :upside_down_face:

3 Likes

QGIS is an excellent platform to perform coordinate transformations - Geographic or Projected - as well as georeferencing. Esri ArcGIS is the best, but prohibitively expensive.

2 Likes

I haven’t given any serious time yet to QGIS, as I have WAY TOO MANY software applications under my belt in many different aspects and not sure I need to add this one just yet… BUT… can it be used in the field connected to any of the Reach receivers, and used to collect points, stake out points, GNSS local transformation etc? I.e.like everything in FieldGenius?

Or is it mainly an office product?

Again, I haven’t spent any considerable amount of time with it… but I do see the benefit of it for coordinate systems, projections, georef, vector layers, etc.

I may dive into this one soon also for in the office work. ; )

Edit: derrrrr… totally forgot @Brent_W tutorial on QGIS!
https://docs.emlid.com/reachrs/common/tutorials/qgis-survey/

1 Like

QGIS is primarily an office product, but there is QField. I don’t use it because it is Android, and I use iOS in the field as my primary interest is drone mapping. If you have any GIS experience, it is not to difficult to learn (but then again, I have been doing GIS professionally for 30 years). I just collect my unprojected points in the field, feed those in with the GPS tagged aerial photos from my drone, create an aerotriangulated orthomosaic, and then transform it to a projected coordinate system, and do a local transformation if necessary. I also layout check points with the ground control points to confirm the measurements. I am hoping that the Reachview Survey tool will be sufficient for my needs since I need to bring the unprojected coords back to the office anyway.

3 Likes

With QGIS you will have everything Reachview is missing so you’ll be fine.

2 Likes

That is not always true , but stuff has to get done :wink:

1 Like

QGIS isn’t intended to layout points (other than visually) but it can be used on the field (on a windows tablet, etc.) to save points, make polygons, convert files, make lines, divide lines into points, do any raster operation, view your background imagery, shift points, and much, much, more. You can also produce your finished site plan in QGIS.

  1. We need to crowdfund a layout (stakeout) plugin for QGIS.
1 Like

Though you can create points files and DXF linework for export/import in QGIS. At least Reachview will accept the points, but unfortunately you still have the incapability of using State Plane coordinates so all of your work would need to be done in QGIS and then transformed to WGS84. It’s actually ALLOT easier than it sounds once you have done it a couple of times.

3 Likes

I do not use my Reach receivers in a construction environment but i find this discussion very interesting. I use NTRIP with CORS but i also use LORA and now PPK as there are sites i am working at where there is not cell service. i would highly suggest you get the second reach unit and do LORA as your day to day accuracy/repeatability and speed of set up will be so much better.

3 Likes

i agree as it would seem to be easier to built in QGIS given the existing building blocks and then maybe port it to qfield. the recent developments in proj4/proj6 would seem to address some of the trickier issues with going from WGS84 to stateplane and providing ground to grid conversion on the fly.

1 Like

This topic was automatically closed 100 days after the last reply. New replies are no longer allowed.