Vertical surface laser layout devices, systems, software?

Does anyone know of any devices, systems and software that can lay points, line work out on large vertical and/or curved surfaces not just horizontal like the Emlid Reach products?

I know Leica has some good devices such as the 3D Disto, or even some of the Robotic Total Stations, but just curious what else is out there. Hilti does also.

Ideally I would like to be able to 3D scan the large objects (record location set up on), then import the point cloud into 3D CAD software to do the work required, then re-project or layout all the NEW points back onto the same surface after re-setting back up on the same spot and calibrating to a few initial control points recorded. Locations would all be different, not just a small system in a shop for small objects. (i.e. not like handheld scanners used to replicate small objects for 3D printing replication).

Thanks! :upside_down_face:

So let’s see if I have this straight…

You’re working outside; you have more than one large object that you are trying to laser scan into a model; then make adjustments to that model; then use that model to indicate what adjustments need to be made to the large objects.

So I take it that you’re building stone henge and the position and orientation of the large stones is critical for a planned ceremony coming up this century.

I suppose that if the large objects are all within range of the laser, then you don’t need Reach for the job, but if they are not within range, then Reach could be very handy for the job for georeferencing/tying together each point cloud.

p.s. ReachView may not have linework features (yet), but it does have 3D stakeout. :stuck_out_tongue_winking_eye:

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Uh…yeah… no… not quite. :wink:

Basically instead of using Reach products to measure and stake out (or layout) points only on the typical horizontal surface, I am looking for equipment to do this on vertical surfaces also. I.e kinda like MEP layout I guess, but more complex. Simplest form would be laying out points on a flat wall… then more complex around curved surfaces such as in cylindrical shape or even more complex.

Probably involves laser scanning and projection mapping.

May be something in the realm of 3D Disto. Robotic Total Station, Hilti, Faro etc.

Simultaneous scanning and positioning basically in 3D space.

Localized system.

Yeah, no Stone Henge. Leave that to Clark Griswold. :rofl:

HeftyNiceLark-small

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Buy a used prismless total station on EBay :slight_smile: you can get a calibrated one for under 2000 usd.

You could also buy into the 3D disto, but by the time you have all the components, you have spent as much as for a used total station. And the disto setup would still be flimsier…

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OK, so instead of building stone henge, you want to have an all-night party at stone henge with bands and a stage. When the sun sets you want all your decorations and placements to cast some cool shadow art against the stage on that particular evening sunset.

Fair enough. So we’re talking about laser scanning stone henge, then modeling your event area and the stage and all the decorations and placements. Then on the day before your event, the trucks roll in and you set up this ‘specialized laser equipment’ and it:

  • scans the area
  • orients itself within your model
  • determines the location of each piece to be installed
  • uses visible laser or video projection techniques to project an outline or image where each piece is to be installed
  • also uses laser measurements to guide the installers to put the piece at the correct distance / rotation / orientation

Then all the pieces will be in perfect placement for the sunset shadow effects.

(and if Clark Grizwold does show up, you will have the tools to be able to put everything back in place before the ‘authorities’ notice :stuck_out_tongue_closed_eyes:)

So, apart from the fabricated stone henge party, are we getting close? Close in that you need to:
a) capture a ‘before’ model of the existing structure
b) make additions/adjustments to the model
c) use live capture and projection techniques to make the additions/adjustments in real life with great accuracy

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