Need help to select a right solution for my rover bot

I am building a mower robot where I would like to integrate an RTK to provide precise GPS coordinates to move the bot. I researched many products online and found EMLID has some good product lines.

My budget is low. I am looking for an inexpensive solution to collect precise location data to feed into my ROS waypoint navigation. Can I use PPK instead RTK? With a base station or without to get more precise location data?

Any help is appreciated.

The M2 would be a good choice. Try to keep the antenna at a higher point that the electronics and preferably not directly over them. You’ll need some source of corrections whether that be a CORS via NTRIP, Local Base NTRIP or Local base with LoRa radio. I have no proof but I would think the local radio would be the fastest transmission and probably more stable than going over a network connection.

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M2 is $649 still expensive for a residential bot whose price is less than $800-900 in total. Can I use M+, does it have any ROS drivers available?

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An M+ would be ok if there are many trees or other obstructions. Honestly though you are going to have a hard time beating $1250 for a multi-channel rover/base as capable as the M2.

How to get professional advice or a solution from EMLID? I am working on a prototype and will soon want to produce a commercial version of it. I will need 1000 units later on.

Convenience costs money, there is no other solution currently that is more easy to use and able to connect to as many peripherals as Emlid.

If you are producing a commercial product would it not be easier to research and electrically engineer your own product and software to support it. That would custom fit your device only and not need any capacity for peripheral connections outside your design?

Then you could set the price level of your research, hardware and development costs?

What would an applicable system ideally cost for your device?

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Hi Mansur,

If your goal is precise navigation, it’s possible in RTK only. And for RTK, you always need a base. As Michael said, it can be either your own base or an NTRIP service.

I understand the questions of budget, but I also agree that Reach M2 is more suitable here. A mower robot is a ground vehicle. So the angle above the horizon is reduced, by definition. Also, such a robot is most likely used in more or less urban areas. This all reduces the number of satellites, which can be used in calculations.

With a single-band device, like Reach M+, you may come to the point where it’s just impossible to calculate the precise solution because there is no enough data. Multi-band devices, like Reach M2, can handle it.

I’m here for you. And if you have other questions or doubts, don’t hesitate to share them! If there is something you don’t want to discuss publically, you can contact us at support@emlid.com.

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Do you have any PPK or any 4G or 5G enabled PPK which does not require a local base station?

Mount an RX on that thing!

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Hi Mansur,

All Reach devices except RX support PPK. But the thing here is that you can’t navigate the robot in PPK.

For example, you can obtain precise track for your robot with PPK and somehow make it follow this track. But robot can’t follow the precise track if it doesn’t receive the precise position stream in real-time.

If you don’t want to set up your own base, you can work with an NTRIP service. But still, in RTK.

If I didn’t get your point right, please let me know.

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You got my point right. Thanks for clarifying. Can I connect an M+ device with an NTRIP service? Is there a paid service like Sixfab.com provide?

Reach M+ works with NTRIP services providing corrections in RTCM3 format. If you have a subscription to such NTRIP service, you can simply connect Reach to a Wi-Fi network and enter your NTRIP credentials. Here’s a little bit more about workflow.

If your mower robot is working next to buildings and trees M2 would be a better choice.

M+ is a single band device and will have a hard time maintaining fix in obscured areas.